Firework Safety

Posted by Kat on 6/28/2017 to Safety Tips
Firework Safety

With the approach of Independence Day, we can all prepare for some fun, festivities, parades, food, and of course FIREWORKS. Crowds of people, mixed with open flames is something that can turn completely chaotic if the proper knowledge, and preparation isn’t applied. Professionals put on their own firework displays for the public to enjoy but of course there is still the fireworks that can be purchased at a local market or a firework stand. Although these fireworks are for the public to purchase, it does not mean that they are deemed safe.

Incognito Influenza

Posted by Elijah H. on 6/20/2017 to Safety Tips
Incognito Influenza

Music festivals, Holiday gatherings, Summer events, and pandemic flu virus go hand in hand around this time of bustling year. If you’re out having fun in the sun this summer, you should be aware of the dangers that lurk in the common air. Close quarter events can easily turn from a blast to a bad day, especially for individuals not implementing NPIs in their everyday life. CDC describes NPIs (non pharmaceutical Interventions) as “actions that people and communities can take, apart from getting vaccinated and taking medications, to help slow the spread of respiratory illnesses.” These are also known as mitigation strategies.

Hurricane Safety

Posted by Elijah H. on 6/12/2017
Hurricane Safety

No one minds being rocked like a hurricane if it’s at the hands of 80’s hit band Scorpians! However, being rocked by an actual hurricane wouldn’t be such a good experience. The horrors of a hurricanes are all too real, and if you aren’t prepared, and fail to take the necessary precautions. When it comes to knowing the basics and beyond, luckily experts at CDC have been consistent about keeping the public updated on tips and tricks to keep you and your family safe from this unavoidable disaster.

Sun Exposure

Posted by Kat on 6/2/2017 to Safety Tips
Sun Exposure

Our skin is an important part of our body. Skin is the largest organ in a human. It covers our entire skeletal structure, and can become a painful inconvenience when, and if it gets damaged. Bruises, cuts, scrapes, and even sunburn. Sunburn is a silent attacker that has gotten over one third of adults, and almost one third of the teen population.

Tick Borne Illness

Posted by DEVIN on 5/30/2017 to Safety Tips
Tick Borne Illness

With the increasing number in tick borne illnesses, it is becoming more and more important to be aware of the risk, as well as the prevention. Ticks are commonly known to be more active in the spring, summer, and early-fall. This fact highly increases the potential for you, your loved ones, or your pets to be bitten. According to the Center for Disease Control has reported that over thirty thousand cases of Lyme disease are reported annually in the just the United States alone. It is essential that you be mindful to the possibility of being infected and take the necessary steps to ensure that you are protected from these silent killers.

The Human Heart

Posted by KAT on 5/19/2017 to Physical Health
The Human Heart
The human heart is a very strong, hardworking engine inside the human body. Each part within the heart has their own unique auto responsive job working together to power the entire body. As we all know, the heart is a pump which moves the blood through the body constantly. The arteries and veins can be thought of as the pipes of the engine that flow blood throughout the entire body. The various parts of the heart which are known as chambers, have distinct functions as previously mentioned.

Sleep Deprivation Dangers

Posted by KAT on 5/12/2017 to Physical Health
Sleep Deprivation Dangers

Sleep deprivation is an easily-developed type of sleep disorder commonly known as insomnia. This sleeping disorder affects the pattern, or consistency, of a person’s sleeping habits. Whether you are not sleeping enough or not sleeping well, this disorder has been linked to numerous health issues and heightened health risks. Insomnia is an easily recognizable disorder that clearly affects your mental and physical performance, and has also shown to negatively affect emotional function and understanding. The diagnosis of this disorder is often overlooked and symptoms are mistakenly attributed to a hectic schedule at work, home, or other areas in life.

Snake Bite Facts

Posted by CPR Savers on 5/5/2017
Snake Bite Facts

According to Healthline.com, over 7,000 snake bites are reported yearly just in the United States alone. Imagine that number on top of the snake bite encounters that go unreported throughout the year.

Not all snake bites are fatal, but there is the considerable risk of an allergic reaction or an infection. With that in mind, all snake bites should be taken seriously and treated immediately with the proper knowledge and materials. Treating the snake bite as soon as capable significantly lowers these risks, and generally shortens the victim’s recovery time. It is highly recommended to get to a medical facility to initiate emergency treatment of all snake bites. Remember: always treat a snake bite as though it is venomous.

Lead Poisoning... A Reminder

Posted by KAT on 4/28/2017 to Safety Tips
Lead Poisoning... A Reminder

Lead poisoning, whether in small or substantial amounts, can both severely affect mental and physical development in children as well as in adults. However, children below the age of 6 years old are known to be more susceptible to encountering a lead based material, or object and becoming contaminated. This fact is supported by the idea of younger children who normally tend to put their hands, or items in their mouth. Lead based paint has been seen to be used when making children’s toys, painting older homes before the ban of lead based paint in 1978, or even from the soil in which we plant our fruits and vegetables to be eaten from. Although to this day many of these products have been recalled, and steps have been taken to cease further production of these chemicals, we are still finding lead in our water system from which we bathe in, drink from, wash our hands, rinse our fruits and vegetables, water our plants, and so on.

Tobacco: A Dangerous Addiction

Posted by Kat on 1/23/2017 to Physical Health
Tobacco: A Dangerous Addiction

Tobacco is not just one of the five main leading causes of death in the world today, but also a billion-dollar industry robbing the funds of society through addiction-based products. Cigarettes come in all different quantities, sizes, colors, prices, intensity, and flavors, but they all have the same negative affect on a user’s body—and budget.

The first step to quitting is accepting the fact that you want to be healthy and no longer fund your destruction. 18 of every 100 adults, 25–44 years old (meaning 17.7% of Americans) smoke cigarettes regularly throughout the week, and that’s not including international statistics. The British American Tobacco company has agreed to merge with big time U.S. tobacco company Reynolds American as of 01/17/2017, promising to become an $86 billion-dollar tobacco company that already has a standing reputation in the international market. Based upon the statistics and recent facts, we can now see room for much more profit, hence much more production, hence many more users, hence many more deaths.

What is Pulse Oximetry?

Posted by Rhett on 1/10/2017 to Physical Health
What is Pulse Oximetry?

If you've been to the doctor recently, you can probably still recall the tiny device that the nurse clipped loosely onto the tip of your finger. You most likely didn't ask about it, but this cute, little clip—called a pulse oximeter—was reading your oxygen saturation levels, a metric used to determine how much oxygen is available in your blood. As a vital element that our organs need in order to keep working, low levels could indicate a serious issue—even a level below 92% can suggest hypoxia (deprivation of adequate oxygen).

2 Million Pounds of Chicken Recalled

Posted by Rhett on 12/6/2016 to Safety Tips
2 Million Pounds of Chicken Recalled

Almost 2 million pounds of ready-to-eat chicken was recalled this month, expanding from the original November 23rd recall of 17,439 pounds. Although the recall is only a safety procedure, and it is not certain that the chicken is undercooked or contains dangerous bacteria, National Steak and Poultry urges everyone to take special precaution and either dispose of the food immedaitely or return it to the place of purchase.

All of the ready-to-eat packaged chicken was produced between August 20 and November 30 of this year. Check here for a complete list of all recalled chicken products, available on the US Food Safety and Inspection Service website.

Getting a Broken Bone to Heal Faster

Posted by Sandy on 11/29/2016 to Physical Health
Getting a Broken Bone to Heal Faster

Car accident, sports, or even just a bad fall. Dealing with a broken bone can be tough. Not only do you have to deal with the pain, but the disruption it causes to our school and work lives and freetime can be debilitating and downright depressing. Even just a minor leg fracture could take six to eight weeks to properly heal, and the older you are, the more time it may take.

There's no doubt that anyone who has suffered from a broken bone wants one thing more than anything else: to get fixed faster. Luckily, there are steps that you can take to make sure that your bone gets the proper nutrition and attention it needs to mend itself quickly, so that you can get back to living your action-filled life in comfort.

First Aid Care for Burns

Posted by Rhett on 11/28/2016 to Emergency Care
First Aid Care for Burns

You have likely heard of first-, second-, and third-degree burns, but you might not know how to recognize them, avoid them, and respond to them when necessary.

Dementia in Americans Over 65 Falls by 24%

Posted by Sandy on 11/22/2016 to Physical Health
Dementia in Americans Over 65 Falls by 24%

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe conditions in which loss of memory or thinking skills prevents a person from performing everyday tasks. Alzheimer's disease is the most common instance of dementia, but there are other diseases and conditions, including vitamin definciences, that can cause the symptoms of dementia.

Thanksgiving Safety Tips from American Red Cross

Posted by Sandy on 11/21/2016 to Safety Tips
Thanksgiving Safety Tips from American Red Cross

The day is almost here, and whether you are hosting or traveling this year, we want you to enjoy the holiday by staying safe with these Thanksgiving safety tips, courtesy of American Red Cross.

CPR Training: Head-Tilt/Chin-Lift vs. Jaw-Thrust Maneuvers

Posted by Rhett on 11/17/2016 to Emergency Care

When performing CPR, it's tantamount that you be able to clear the person's airway to allow your rescue breaths to reach their lungs. The two most common methods for opening the airway are the head-tilt/chin-lift and jaw-thrust maneuvers. While the head-tilt/chin-lift is the preferred method, it can be dangerous to use on a patient who may have a cervical spine injury.

World Diabetes Day: Diabetes Facts and Stats

Posted by Rhett on 11/14/2016 to Physical Health

Today's Google logo might not seem as recognizable as some of the other ones you've seen, but it still symbolizes a very important day in the history of medical care: the birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, the man who first developed insulin as a treatment for diabetes, earning a Nobel Prize in 1923, and becoming knighted by King George V in 1934. November 14th is also appropriately marked as World Diabetes Day, in the hopes of bringing awareness to the severity and seriousness of the common disease.

Kentucky Requires CPR Training for High School Graduates

Posted by Rhett on 11/10/2016 to Emergency Care
Kentucky Requires CPR Training for High School Graduates

According to the Mayo Clinic, for every three witnessed cardiac arrests that happen outside of a hospital, only one victim receives CPR from a bystander. The greatest reason bystanders are hesitent to help is because they aren't confident in their knowledge of CPR and fear hurting the person.

In an effort to bolster CPR and AED awareness, there has been a recent surge of states who have been passing new laws requiring high school graduates to take CPR training offered by the school. Kentucky has become the 35th state on the growing list.

Talk to Your Kids about the Harm of Smoking

Posted by Sandy on 11/9/2016 to Physical Health
Talk to Your Kids about the Harm of Smoking

Smoking causes new DNA mutations every year you smoke!

A new study that compared the genetic analysis results of 2,490 smokers and 1,063 respondents who never smoked a tobacco cigarette before found that for each year you smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, 150 mutations are generated in each of your lung cells. Additionally, 97 mutations are produced in each cell of your larynx, 39 in each of your pharynx cells, 23 in your mouth cells, 18 in your bladder cells, and 6 in your liver cells.

But even knowing this, it is hard for people to quit. Hopefully we can help reduce the harmful effects smoking has on our society by stopping the habit before it begins by talking to our youth.

"Start the Beat" Petition Hopes to Raise Awareness of CPR and AED Training

Posted by Rhett on 11/7/2016 to Emergency Care

"K.H." created a petition in late October asking the White House to launch a nation-wide campaign called "Start the Beat" in an effort to spread awareness of the seriousness of sudden cardiac arrest, the leading cause of death in the United States. Citing other national campaigns like "Stop, drop, and roll" and "Stop the bleed," K.H. hopes that "Start the Beat" will become common knowledge to citizens in the U.S.

At only 868 signatures so far, the Start the Beat petition needs more than 99,000 more signatures by November 20 to get a response from the White House. Sign the petition and help spread the word about heart health!

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/launch-national-campaign-start-beat-increase-awareness-cpraed-use-improve-survival-cardiac-arrest

Flu Season Courtesy and Tips for Staying Healthy

Posted by Rhett on 11/3/2016 to Physical Health
Flu Season Courtesy and Tips for Staying Healthy

It's the time of year that the flu starts to emerge from hiberation and slowly take over in schools, shopping malls, and the workplace. This might not sound like a big deal—you might miss a few days at work or your kids might miss some school—but while most people only come down with a mild illness, some people may develop complications like pneumonia and bronchitis, which could require hospitalization and even result in death. People at high risk (children younger than 5, adults older than 65, pregnant women, and those with chronic health problems) are particularly susceptible.

Even if you don't fall in any of these categories, you probably know someone who does, and it's part of your own responsibility to keep yourself healthy so that you don't spread the flu to the people you love!

TURN and TEST & House Fire Safety Tips

Posted by Rhett on 11/2/2016 to Safety Tips
TURN and TEST & House Fire Safety Tips

It's that unfortunate time of year that most of us need to remember to turn our clocks back one hour (and probably lose an hour of sleep because of it). The American Red Cross also suggests that this is a great opportunity to remember to also check your smoke alarms: TURN your clock back and TEST your fire alarms. Most smoke alarms can be tested by simply pushing a test button—definitely worth the time and effort when working fire alarms cut the risk of death in a house fire by half!

While you're at it, you can also prepare for home fires or emergencies in other ways as well, including planning your family escape plan and preparing an emergency/burn first aid kit.

Emergency Care for your Pet: CPR on Dog or Cat

Posted by Sandy on 11/1/2016 to Pet Safety

They are often considered our best friends, but sometimes we aren't prepared to treat them in case of an accident or emergency. Today's lesson, on performing CPR on a dog or cat, will be the first article in our pet safety series.

Marking the end of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Posted by Sandy on 10/31/2016 to Physical Health
Marking the end of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October, the National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, is coming to a close (Happy Halloween!) and we at CPR Savers wanted to remind everyone that while you enjoy your treat-filled holiday, you should keep in mind what else this month is about.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women (skin cancer being the first), and can even affect men. Last year, it was estimated that 290,000 women would be newly diagnosed with breast cancer and around 40,000 would die to the disease. If you haven't recently, it may be time to schedule an appointment with your doctor.

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